Drone Podcast 029 - Australian Drone Pilot Sandrine Hecq

Sandrine Hecq - Australian Drone Pilot

The Drone Trainer Podcast 029 – Sandrine Hecq

Welcome to episode 29 of The Drone Trainer Podcast! This week I’ve got Sandrine Hecq from Australia who is here to discuss how she’s creating such awesome travel and ocean drone photos! Check it out and subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so that you don’t miss this or any of the future podcast episodes!

Sandrine Hecq - Australian Drone PilotI came across Sandrine Hecq’s work on Instagram a few months ago, and absolutely love her photographic drone style! Sandrine is based in Perth, Australia, however she’s one of the lucky ones that gets to travel the world and bring her drone with her along the way!

Speaking of traveling wth your drone, Sandrine has some tips for how to fly with your drone and best way to check or take it as carryon luggage.

In what seems like a common theme lately with podcast guests, Sandrine is also a massive fan of Polarpro filters. I’m also a proud owner of Polarpro’s awesome lineup of drone filters. If you’re looking to have your photos pop like Sandrine’s, I’d highly recommend starting with some high quality filters. If you want to take things one step further and use some wicked Lightroom presets, check out Sandrine’s new preset pack right here. I’ve got a set of them and they are AWESOME! As she says, they do a great job with drone photos, but they’re so versatile that they can be easily utilized on all of your digital photography.

An obvious benefit of travelling with her drone is that she can capture some wicked landscapes all around the world. A hilarious side benefit is that she also comes across situations where she has to buy her drones back from the locals that confiscate them. If you want to find out more about how that happened, and how much it cost, you’ll have to listen in!

I hope you enjoyed this episode of The Drone Trainer Podcast! Once you’ve had a listen, feel free to leave a comment below so that Sandrine and I can hear what you think!

Check out Sandrine’s work and follow her on social media!

 

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4 Comments

  1. Hi, Chris,

    I’ve only started listening to the podcast a few weeks ago, and just got my first “real” drone, a P4Pv2, but I’ve already listened to most of the episodes (not listening in any particular order). I love the podcast, and what you’re doing, but I have to say that you’ve lost a bit of respect in airing this episode.

    I’ve been involved in manned aviation for more than 15 years, so I know how important a positive image is for the industry. It shouldn’t surprise anyone, then, that I think a positive image is equally (if not more, given all the negative press it gets) important to the drone industry.

    That said, I don’t think this episode should be published. Sandrine, with her “I don’t care what the rules or law are, I’m going to do it anyway” attitude is an absolute black eye on the industry. She should not be given a platform from which to preach this message.

  2. Hi Rich, I’m sorry you feel this way.
    My podcast has helped so many people and I didn’t mention that I don’t care about the drone laws.
    I think you may have misunderstood. If a place doesn’t allow drones, I will speak to the owners or managers and figure out a way to drone the area. Eg- Maldives 🇲🇻 I had to get all the plane flight time and only fly at certain times letting the resort know.
    Zimbabwe- I found a hotel near Vic Falls and got permission to fly and give them the footage. Usually you can’t drone there. Northern Territory- I got the rangers permission to fly. Iceland was the only place where I couldn’t speak to someone… it’s a drones paradise and everyone drones there. I don’t break any rules… I fight them and end up getting the opportunity to film. You won’t go far in life if you don’t try and pursue your passions.

    1. Hi, Sandrine,

      I just listened to the podcast episode again, because if I misunderstood I wanted to correct that misunderstanding. Here are a couple of direct quotes:

      “Sometimes there’s a sign that says no droning, but I’ll go a little bit bad, I’ll drone anyway, because, I just want to get the shots.”

      “I even found out that in Vietnam you’re not allowed to drone anywhere, but I mean the policeman or people that work there are more than happy for you to drone if you just maybe ask beforehand.”

      “I do look the drone rules up, but if I have an opportunity to drone, I will do it. Sounds bad, but it’s the truth.”

      You’ve openly admitted that you buck the rules knowingly, and that you’re just going to do it. You said, “Sounds bad…” True. That’s because it is bad. If you fail to respect the laws and/or local rules regarding drones, you give all of us a bad name. I stand by my initial assessment.

  3. Hi, Sandrine,

    I just listened to the podcast episode again, because if I misunderstood I wanted to correct that misunderstanding. Here are a couple of direct quotes:

    “Sometimes there’s a sign that says no droning, but I’ll go a little bit bad, I’ll drone anyway, because, I just want to get the shots.”

    “I even found out that in Vietnam you’re not allowed to drone anywhere, but I mean the policeman or people that work there are more than happy for you to drone if you just maybe ask beforehand.”
    Getting a police officer’s permission doesn’t change the fact that you’re breaking the law.

    “I do look the drone rules up, but if I have an opportunity to drone, I will do it. Sounds bad, but it’s the truth.”

    You’ve openly admitted that you buck the rules knowingly, and that you’re just going to do it. You said, “Sounds bad…” True. That’s because it is bad.

    “I know that at Victoria Falls which we were at in Zimbabwe, like when they saw us come through the airport they could see that we have drones because of our bags, and they were just like ‘You’re not allowed to drone, you know, you’ll get fined if you get caught.’ And we just I was so shattered because I travelled all the way there so that I could get some drone footage. And I looked to try to find if there was any spot that I could take it up from and obviously you’re not allowed. And then a friend of mine who lives there I contacted said, ‘ah, there’s a specific hotel the Victoria Falls hotel and they allow you to take the drone off from there. And um, you can just fly to the falls, so that’s what I’ve done. Obviously there’s a lot of helicopters around so you have to make sure that you’re flying at the right time because you are putting other people’s lives in danger. So I’ve just made sure to be very cautious but I’ve always been very determined to find a way to drone.”

    Here, you’ve told us that you’re cautious, but your shots are more important than the fact that you’re putting lives in danger.

    If you fail to respect the laws and/or local rules regarding drones, you give all of us a bad name. I stand by my initial assessment.

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